Ashburton councillors double up on monthly ward surgeries

Ashburton’s three new councillors are to double the number of ward advice surgeries at which local residents can meet them each month to discuss any issues they may have with council services.

Ashburton councillors Maddie Henson, Steven and Andrew Rendle

Ashburton councillors Maddie Henson, Stephen Mann (centre) and Andrew Rendle

They will have a session on the first Tuesday of every month (except August) from 6pm to 7pm in the Cedar Rooms at the St Mildred’s Centre on Bingham Road.

And they will also be available on the third Saturday of every month (except August and December) from 10am to 11am at Longheath Community Centre on Longheath Gardens.

Andrew Rendle, one of the councillors, said, “No appointments are needed but if you want to let us know the issues in advance or you can’t make it and need help, email any of us at andrew.rendle@croydon.gov.uk, maddie.henson@croydon.gov.uk or stephen.mann@croydon.gov.uk .”


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This entry was posted in Andrew Rendle, Ashburton, Maddie Henson, Stephen Mann and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Ashburton councillors double up on monthly ward surgeries

  1. davidcallam says:

    I have never had the need to attend a councillors’ surgery, but I have often wondered whether they are still necessary in an age when councillors are accessible by phone or e-mail. I’ve heard some very unflattering descriptions of the kind of people who frequent such surgeries. How valuable are these traditional meeting places in a wider political context?

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