Paxton anniversary offers chance to review Palace future

Original Crystal PalaceThe top site of Crystal Palace Park may not now become home to Boris Johnson’s £500million vanity project.

But that is not the last we may hear about plans to reconstruct Paxton’s Crystal Palace.

Paxton’s Crystal Palace Corner was erected in 2008 as a free-standing educational exhibit, situated within the footprint of the site – from 1854 until its conflagration in 1936 – of the original Crystal Palace, which had been designed by Sir Joseph Paxton for the Great Exhibition.

Sir Joseph Paxton's grave in

Sir Joseph Paxton’s grave at St Peter’s, Chatsworth

The Paxton Crystal Palace Reconstruction Project aims to extend the already existing corner by two more window frames, creating a Paxton Crystal Palace Unit.

The Reconstruction Project will be launched next Monday, June 8, on the actual 150th anniversary of Paxton’s death.

The announcement will take place at the Paxton family grave at St Peter’s Church, Chatsworth in the presence of The Duke of Devonshire, who is the Honorary President of the Crystal Palace Museum.

John Greatrex will be giving talks about the Reconstruction Project in the next few weeks:

On Wednesday, June 10 at the Grape and Grain Pub, Crystal Palace (from 8pm).

On Thursday, June 11, at Crystal Palace Cinema on Church Road (8pm).

And on Friday, June 12, at the Crooked Billet Pub, Penge (from 7.30pm).

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