TfL condemn Addiscombe to extra week of road closures

Tail backs on side roads around Addiscombe have blighted the neighbourhood for the last week

The roadworks in Addiscombe which have caused traffic chaos for more than a week will continue at least for an additional seven days.

Transport for London shut down the tram network from East Croydon to Beckenham and New Addington on August 23, and closed the A232 Addiscombe Road for co-ordinated major works while engineering work towards the completion of the strengthening of the Blackhorse Lane Bridge was undertaken.

The works were all meant to be completed by this weekend, in time for the first school runs of the new term this week.

But although a normal tram service is expected to resume on Monday morning, TfL has updated its website to indicate that the road closures on the A232 in the Sandilands, Addiscombe and Shirley area will now continue for a further week, under September 9.

Local buses will continue to be on diversion:

  • Routes 119, 194 and 198 will not serve Addiscombe Road in either direction. Instead, they will divert via Shirley Road, Lower Addiscombe Road and Cherry Orchard Road.
  • Route 466 will not serve Shirley Hills Road, Upper Shirley Road or Addiscombe Road. Instead it will divert via Coombe Lane, Coombe Road and Park Hill Road.

The Addiscombe Road this morning, empty of traffic, or any workmen

In a statement, TfL said that the delays are “due to circumstances not in our control”.

“Please be assured we are working with the utilities companies and the London Borough of Croydon to return the road network to normal as soon as we are able to,” a TfL spokeswoman said this morning.

The past week has been one of traffic misery for those living on the residential side streets off the Addiscombe Road, and they are feeling badly let down by TfL over their failure to complete their works within their own timetable.

Some residents were given an update yesterday evening by TfL that said the road would be closed “until further notice”.

“We are delivering letters to residents in the road closure area today to make them aware of this situation,” TfL said.

According to TfL, the dleay was “caused by the discovery of a gas leak in the area prior to the start of work on Friday August 23. For safety reasons this prevented our work from starting until the utility had been repaired. We had hoped to be able to recover the time with additional machinery and resources, but it is now clear this will not be possible.

“Further to this, while carrying out work a pre-existing water main leak was discovered on Wednesday August 28.” TfL were expecting Thames Water to repair this yesterday, “but this is why we are unable to confirm the end date for the road closure at this stage”.

The on-going road closures are:
• A232 Chepstow Road remains closed between its junctions with Addiscombe Road, Radcliffe Road and Clyde Road
• A232 Addiscombe Road remains closed at its junctions with Sandilands in the south and Ashburton Road in the north
• Through traffic is diverted via A212 Cherry Orchard Road, Lower Addiscombe Road and Shirley Road in the north, and via Park Hill and Coombe Lane in the south
• Temporary traffic lights will control left turning traffic, one-way only from Clyde Road to Addiscombe Road
• Ashburton Road will operate two-way instead of one-way
• Oaks Road in Shirley will temporarily operate one-way only, eastbound from Coombe Wood towards Upper Shirley Road. It will not be possible to enter Oaks Road from Upper Shirley Road
• Pedestrian and cyclist access will continue to be maintained at all times
• Diversion route signs will remain in place

“Going to be a lot more congestion on Lower Addiscombe Road… schools are back next week,” one frustrated resident noted on social media.

Others are losing patience. “We could understand it if all the works were being done with any urgency,” said one, “but there’s not a workman to be seen this morning. Closing such a major road for more than two weeks might be the convenient solution for TfL, but it has caused nothing but chaos and misery for locals.”

Click here for the original TfL notice and details of the closures.


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About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and political times in the diverse and most-populated borough in London. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com
This entry was posted in Addiscombe East, Addiscombe West, East Croydon, TfL, Tramlink, Transport and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to TfL condemn Addiscombe to extra week of road closures

  1. Mike Buckley says:

    AS other correspondents have said it would have been good if TfL could have put more urgency into the matter – what abou the Blackhorse Lane bridge, will this ever be open again? Nobody, except TfL, expected the end date to be adhered to, no matter what the excuses are! Irt would be good and most interesting to know where the gas and water leaks were. Now on a more positive note their has not bee traffic chaos as described, indeed I travelled down Shirley Road on Friday at 08.45 and there was hardly any traffic and five tram replacement buses just parked, going nowhere fast. The Lower Addiscombe Road has been solid with moving vehicles, so no great drama there, and my recent trip on a 198 bus took very little longer than it usually does, indeed, the driver had to wait at some stops in Shirley/West Wickham to let the timetable catch up.. SO the chaos simple is not there – I live south of the Addiscombe Road in side roads where there is not supposed to be any diverted traffic, athough canny drivers know better, and, yes, its been busy and the odd artic has damaged a few trees, but its not a great drama.. I am reminded of mountains and mole hills.

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  2. Liz Brereton says:

    I went to the open event before it started and they told me that it was decided to be better to do all the necessary works in one go rather than staggered which would mean closing roads at various times which was deemed to be more disruptive than doing it all in one go. They also told me that TFL aren’t allowed to put in a planned diversion down a residential road unless it is an ‘A’ road so that meant buses had to be diverted to Lower Addiscombe & Shirley roads. Diversion of 466 doesn’t make sense though nor does one way diversion on Oaks road unless its to lessen traffic for residents from people trying to use a short cut or rat run. On positive side you can access Addiscombe road from Shirley Road; the closure is only from Sandilands onwards. For those using Oaks road be aware that you cannot turn right onto upper shirley road only left.

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    • Mike Buckley says:

      Mujch pooring of concrete at the bridge over on Saturday, little action at Chepstow Road, the road surface has not even been replaced so there is not hope of it reopening, though they have replaced the lead in to the Sandilands reservation with some lovely look green substance in place of the blocks.Now why?

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  3. Mike Buckley says:

    More local residents than ! do not seem to have seen the gas or water leak!

    As of Saturdaya there was concrete being poored by the Bridge and no sign of any road surfact at Chepstow Road though the tram rails and concrete “encasing” was done some time ago. Will trams travel past without the road being surfaced? Will the surfacing be done at night in the short period that trams do not run.

    I wonder or will we siuffer a further delay?

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  4. Sheila Buckley says:

    Well it was all supposed to be over by the end of August, now it’s 19 days later and Ashburton Road and Sandilands are STILL closed.

    At least there was some work going on yesterday, but when will it all finish. How on earth has this anything to do with Blackhorse Lane Bridge?

    TfL should be required to account for this continued delay and those inconvenienced should receive compensation! TfL should be fined for this incompetence! Other utility diggers are required to keep to a timetable or be fined

    Like

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