Gaping hole forces closure of Dingwall Road for two weeks

Dingwall Road seems likely to be closed, with bus routes and traffic diverted, until the end of this month after a serious amount of subsidence occurred outside Renaissance House, the relatively new office block opposite Ruskin Square and East Croydon Station.

Renaissance House opened on Dingwall Road in 2014. Now a hole has opened up in front of it

Renaissance House opened on Dingwall Road in 2014. Now a hole has opened up in front of it

Croydon Council’s road department’s first reaction was to suggest that the closure of this major road would last just until the end of this week.

But further work by what the council calls its “Place department” – under the control of executive director of Jo Negrini – has discovered that backfilling and concreting of the gaping hole will now require the closures to continue until February 28, according to sources in Fisher’s Folly.

Commuters who opt to use East Croydon’s “Bridge to Nowhere” will now have a longer walk to an operating bus stop, with buses now using Bedford Park and Wellesley Road.

It is along Dingwall Road that Transport for London wants to re-route part of the Tramlink network as part of the restructuring of the town centre for the benefit of Westfield and Hammerson.

So the next fortnight’s disruption near one of the busiest railway stations in London should be something we’re all going to have to get used to.


About insidecroydon

News, views and analysis about the people of Croydon, their lives and political times in the diverse and most-populated borough in London. Based in Croydon and edited by Steven Downes. To contact us, please email inside.croydon@btinternet.com
This entry was posted in Croydon Council, Environment, Fairfield, Jo Negrini, Lansdowne Road RA and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Gaping hole forces closure of Dingwall Road for two weeks

  1. derekthrower says:

    Now isn’t that interesting: subsidence problems occurring in an area of concentrated high rises. Just a few yards away are massive construction cranes.

    Wasn’t the Renaissance House development the site where the mobile crane collapsed into a gaping un-surveyed hole? Now in an area with the unique geology of Croydon where chalk meets the sandrocks and clay, have they done sufficient surveying diligence?

    Subsidence appears to be affecting Park Hill Road and the heavy rains of recent times will have had an effect on the chalk beds.

    May we soon be renaming the Croydon Opportunity Area the “Sinkhole Development”?

    Liked by 1 person

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