Proposal to limit high street off licences in Portland Road area

The council wants to extend its licensing control measures, adding a fifth “Cumulative Impact Area” along South Norwood High Street and Portland Road.

Off-putting: the council’s licensing policy is up for renewal

It intends to do so as part of its latest review of its licensing policy, which sets out how applications for alcohol sales, entertainment (such as live music) and late-night refreshment are dealt with.

Croydon has four Cumulative Impact Areas (or CIAs) in its licensing policy relating specifically to off-licences, which were introduced after evidence provided by Public Health, the Violence Reduction Network, and partners such as the police, on local levels of alcohol-related crime and harm.

A Cumulative Impact Area enables the council to limit the number of licence applications granted in a specific area where there is evidence that a high density of licensed premises may be contributing to crime, disorder and public nuisance.

A CIA does not impact existing licenses within an area.

Croydon’s existing CIA’s cover the following areas:

A map of the proposed additional area in South Norwood is available by clicking here.

The consultation runs until November 15, with residents asked to complete an online survey.

This box-ticking exercise will then be pushed through on the nod by the council’s licensing committee before going to Full Council for approval in December.


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1 Response to Proposal to limit high street off licences in Portland Road area

  1. Ian Kierans says:

    ”A Cumulative Impact Area enables the council to limit the number of licence applications granted in a specific area where there is evidence that a high density of licensed premises may be contributing to crime, disorder and public nuisance.”

    So a single large shop selling alcohol until the early hours in one of the highest crime wards would be unaffected?

    The impact of the loss of effective investigators and enforcement officers may save money.
    But convoluted, time consuming and essentially unenforceable processes and regulations cost a hell of a lot more and just give the Police a bigger job to do as Civil enforcement in this Borough has failed.

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